General

When can I expect my sample pack to arrive?

We aim to dispatch your sample order within 2 business days, unless sample stock is not available. 

All sample orders are sent with tracking details provided via email. 

Delivery

 

Flooring

State NSW QLD
Metro $88 $88

Regional

Area

$176 $176

Great

Regional

Area

$350 $350

Estimated

Delivery

Time

3-5 Days 3-5 Days

 

Tiles

State NSW QLD
Metro $88 $88
Regional $110 $110

Estimated

Delivery

Time

12 Days 12 Days

 

Rugs

State Metro
Regional Areas
Delivery Time
NSW $29 3-5 days
QLD $29 3-5 days

 

If you buy different type items at the same time, you only need to pay for the higher delivery charge.

For example, if you live at Brisbane, bought 50sqm hybrid flooring, 10sqm tiles, 2 rugs. You only pay for $88.

 

Do I need to be home for delivery?

Yes, you will need to be home during the 8 hour delivery window provided to accept delivery. For all large orders the driver will require your assistance to hand unload your order quickly and efficiently. If you live in a unit complex please advise in the notes section of your order. 

Can I collect my order to save money?

Yes, please choose the collect option at checkout, and our customer service team will advise when you order if ready for collection and the address of your local distribution warehouse.

What if I find a better price elsewhere?

we are dedicated to bringing you manufacturer direct prices that cannot be beaten.

In fact, we guarantee it. Find a cheaper price on a stocked item and we will beat it by 10%!  So shop now and save!!

How can I return my purchase?

We hope that you will be delighted with your The Flooring Guys purchase. If you change your mind about your purchase, you are welcome to return your product to our warehouse within 14 days of your purchase date. After 14 days have passed, we unfortunately can’t offer you a refund or exchange.

To be eligible for a return, your item must be unused and in the same condition that you received it. It must also be in its original packaging.

What if my purchase is faulty?

All our products come with our 25 year residential warranty that guarantees the products against premature wear and structural failure.

Our warranties are backed by our permanent partners who has been in business since 1998. so you can be confident in our products and rest assured that we will be here if you need us.

If you have more questions

Flooring

Installation Guide & DIY

Pre Installation Checklist

  1. Check for signs of moisture
    - Subfloor (Concrete slab and Timber substrate)
    - External Site Inspection
    - Internal Site Inspection
  2. Floor Levels
    - Subfloors must have no more than 3mm deviation over 1m
    - Use a straight edge tool to check floor levels
  3. The Internal Environment 
    - No underfloor heating
    - Room temperature should be between 15-30 degrees.
    - Indoor humidity levels should be within 30-70%
    - Appropriate window furnishings to prevent harsh direct sunlight    affecting your floors
    - Ducted heating vents and fireplaces must be regulated at all times to prevent the floor from drying out.

 

Product Inspection

  1. Acclimatisation & Storage 
    - If storing your flooring onsite, cartons should only be opened when installation is ready to commence
  2. Defective Boards 
    - All boards should be checked prior to installation. Look for defects such as; chipping, dents, excessive colour variation, bowing, locking system

Subfloor Preparation

  1. Floor Levelling
    Ensure that the subfloor is clean, flat, smooth and level before installation. Subfloors must have no more than 3mm deviation over 1mFlooring Online recommends Bostik UL-200
       - Concrete Slabs
    - Yellowtongue & Chipboard
    - Existing Floorboards & Tiles
  2. Dry Subfloor
    Ensure that the subfloor is dry and there is no moisture ingress. If your subfloor feels damp to touch, Flooring Online recommends the below product to prevent the moisture damaging your floors.
    - Bostik 3in1 - Timber floor adhesive with built in moisture barrier
    -  Moisture Barrier - Roll on moisture barrier
    - Silent Pro Underlay - 2mm foam underlay with built in moisture barrier
    - Silent Eco Underlay - Effective moisture barrier suitable for installation under standard underlays

 

DIY Installation

  1. Choose your installation method: Direct Stick or Floating
    Direct Stick (Engineered Timber) is the method of glueing your Engineered Timber Floor directly to your slab or substrate. This preferred method provides further stability and durability for years to come, whilst also being quieter under foot and allows for larger expanses of flooring before expansion trims are required.
    Floating (All Floors except Engineered) is the method of clicking together your floor to create a raft and floating it over underlay. This method is ideal for quick and easy installations and allows for you to remove your flooring if needed.

2.Raft Sizes and Expansion Gaps
- All floors expand and contract according to the environmental conditions. To prevent issues such as cupping and peaking, expansion gaps are required around the perimeter of the floor.
- A minimum of 10-15mm (For floating floors) or 8-10mm (For direct stick floors) expansion gap must be left around the perimeter and internal objects such as kitchen benches and cabinetry.
- Scotia, expansion trims and skirts should be used to cover the expansion gaps.

Floor Preparation

1 Remove the existing flooring

1.Remove the existing flooring.png

2 Check the level of the subflooring

2.Check the level of the subflooring.png

3 Sand down high spots

3.Sand down high spots.png

4 Clean and repair old subflooring

4.Clean and repair old subflooring.png

5 Cover the subflooring with a bonding agent

5.Cover the subflooring with a bonding a

6 Mix the leveling compound to a creamy consistency

6.Mix the leveling compound to a creamy

7 Pour the compound over the subflooring

7.Pour the compound over the subflooring

8 Smooth out inconsistencies with a hand trowel

8.Smooth out inconsistencies with a hand

9 Allow the compound to dry

9.Allow the compound to dry.png

10 Sand the entire floor

10.Sand the entire floor.png

11 Check the level again

11.Check the level again.png
Screen Shot 2019-12-05 at 10.21.03 am.pn
Timber Care

Floor Care Residential

  1. Start a regular cleaning and maintenance program immediately after install

  2. Sweep floor regularly with a soft boom or vacuum cleaner to remove dirt, dust and grit.

  3. Wipe spills immediately with a dry clean cloth.

  4. Always add recommended, specially designed cleaning aids to water to prevent the the floor from becoming dull.

  5. Never use all-purpose cleaning products or homemade cleaning solutions, especially those that contain vinegar and methylated spirits, as these can be extremely harmful to timber coatings.

  6. Avoid sharp toys and objects on the floor.

  7. Use felt protectors on furniture legs and avoid direct contact with castors

  8. Place a protective dish under flowerpots.

  9. Use entrance mats and rugs to protect your floor.

Bona floor cleaning products have been protecting and maintaining Household timber floors worldwide for over 90 years. Ongoing care and maintenance is critical for residential timber floors.

Bona supply a complete residential floor cleaning system including spray mops and cleaning pads, as well as cleaners for timber and hard surface floors such as Stone, Tile and Laminate. Additional advice for cleaning timber floors, ceramic tiles, laminate, linoleum, vinyl and marble floors can be found in the free Bona floor maintenance guide downloads below.

Why does my floor look slightly different to what I imagined?

Photos in magazines or the internet will not give you a realistic representation of full species colour or feature. Even a sample flooring board provides just a single representation of the colour and features in that species. It might be noted that many species and types of flooring have a great spread of natural variance. Within a single species the colours and colour variation can be quite pronounced and can differ markedly from one floor to another.  Variation of colour and texture is normal in natural materials and will also be present in synthetic materials, as they are designed to mimic the look and feel of a natural material.

Do you offer flooring installation services?

We know the prospect of installing new floors can be both exciting and daunting; fortunately, we have taken the guesswork out of the process with a guide to assist you as best we can!

more information

How can I measure?

we offer area calculator for your project.

What Should I Prepare for DIY Project?

We know the prospect of installing new floors can be both exciting and daunting; fortunately, we have taken the guesswork out of the process with a guide to assist you as best we can! Indicated on each product is a recommendation to guide your decision to hire a professional or DIY.

If you want to DIY your space with new flooring, we have the created the essentials to check for before installing. From looking for moisture on your subfloor, to how different types of flooring click, this checklist is everything and more for any beginner or a pro looking to put the ‘I’ in installation.

Check for signs of moisture
– Subfloor (Concrete slab and Timber substrate)
– External Site Inspection
– Internal Site Inspection

Floor Levels
– Subfloors must have no more than 3mm deviation over 1m
– Use a straight edge tool to check floor levels

The Internal Environment 
– No underfloor heating
– Room temperature should be between 15-30 degrees.
– Indoor humidity levels should be within 30-70%
– Appropriate window furnishings to prevent harsh direct sunlight    affecting your floors
– Ducted heating vents and fireplaces must be regulated at all times to prevent the floor from drying out.

2. Product Inspection

Acclimatisation & Storage 
– If storing your flooring onsite, cartons should only be opened when installation is ready to commence

Defective Boards 
– All boards should be checked prior to installation. Look for defects such as; chipping, dents, excessive colour variation, bowing, locking system

Upon inspection, if there is any product defects please email photos of your product to [email protected]

3. Subfloor Preparation

Floor Levelling
Ensure that the subfloor is clean, flat, smooth and level before installation. Subfloors must have no more than 3mm deviation over 1mFlooring Online recommends Bostik UL-200
– Concrete Slabs
– Yellowtongue & Chipboard
– Existing Floorboards & Tiles

Dry Subfloor
Ensure that the subfloor is dry and there is no moisture ingress. If your subfloor feels damp to touch, Flooring Online recommends the below product to prevent the moisture damaging your floors.
– Bostik 3in1 – Timber floor adhesive with built in moisture barrier
– Bostik Moisture Seal – Roll on moisture barrier
– Hydro-Stop Underlay – 2mm foam underlay with built in moisture barrier
– Builders Plastic – Effective moisture barrier suitable for installation under standard underlays

4. DIY installation

Choose your installation method: Direct Stick or Floating
– Direct Stick (Engineered Timber & Vinyl only) is the method of glueing your Engineered Timber Floor directly to your slab or substrate. This preferred method provides further stability and durability for years to come, whilst also being quieter under foot and allows for larger expanses of flooring before expansion trims are required.
– Floating (All Floors except Vinyl) is the method of clicking together your floor to create a raft and floating it over underlay. This method is ideal for quick and easy installations and allows for you to remove your flooring if needed.

Raft Sizes and Expansion Gaps
– All floors expand and contract according to the environmental conditions. To prevent issues such as cupping and peaking, expansion gaps are required around the perimeter of the floor.
– A minimum of 10-15mm (For floating floors) or 8-10mm (For direct stick floors) expansion gap must be left around the perimeter and internal objects such as kitchen benches and cabinetry.
– Scotia, expansion trims and skirts should be used to cover the expansion gaps. View our range of Trims & Accessories.

NOTE: All Flooring with Tongue & Groove locking systems are to be installed by a professional flooring installer.

5. Best Practice

We have put together Our top tips for DIY flooring installation that will save you time and ensure you achieve professional results.

Maximum Raft Size Allowances

 Product Dry Areas Humid Areas Floating
 

Direct Stick

Engineered Australian Species & European Oak (Floating) 10m(L) x 8m(W)
 

8m(L) x 8m(W)

 

 

Engineered Australian Species & European Oak (Direct Stick)

 

16m(L) x 12m(W)

 

10m(L) x 8m(W)

 

 

Hybrid
 

12m(L) x 12m(W)

 

12m(L) x 12m(W)

 

 

Laminate
 

10m(L) x 8m(W)

 

8m(L) x 8m(W)

 

 

If you have more questions

Tiles

Do you offer tile installation services?

No, but TFG will be happy to refer you to a list of independent Pro Network partners and local trade professionals who can assist you with your tile and stone installation. However, The TFG does not guarantee these installations or the accuracy of any information provided by the installers and accepts no responsibility for the quality or timeliness of the installation or any inaccuracies or omissions in the information provided. In no event may TFG be held liable for any incidental or consequential damages for any installation or information concerning installation.

What is the best method of cleaning?

When cleaning ceramic or porcelain tiles, it is generally as simple as using hot water with an all purpose liquid cleaner or a ‘soap-less’ detergent. This is a great way for cleaning most walls and floors! 

It is important to ensure you do not use powder based cleaners or soap to clean tiles as it may scratch the surface of a glazed tile, or leave a film on the face of the tiles.

If you are having any specific cleaning or maintenance issues with your tiles, please contact the Tile Touch team who will be able to recommend specialised products for different issues you may be facing. 

Alternatively, TFG recommends Aqua Mix Australia as the industry’s specialists in Cleaning and Maintenance. www.aquamix.com.au 

Do I need to seal my tiles?

Any Ceramic or Porcelain tile which has been glazed will not need to be sealed as the glaze protects the base of the biscuit from absorption.

I heard that my floor tiles must have a certain slip rating. Does this apply to Residential homes?

No. Slip ratings are requirements for Commercial projects only. Whilst commercial slip ratings may give residential customers peace of mind, it is not a requirement when choosing a floor tiles for a residential home. You will need to use your own judgement and discretion when deciding if a certain floor tile is suitable for the space you are tiling. 

Where can you tile?

You can tile over most wall and floor surfaces you find in your home including concrete, timber, brickwork, plasterboard and more: you can even tile over tiles!.

Because each surface type has its own characteristics (such as rate of expansion and contraction, moisture absorption, 'dimensional stability,' and so on), some surfaces may require special preparation and different surfaces will require a different adhesive.

You can find more information about each of the surfaces you're likely to find in your home and how to prepare them for tiling below.

How to Grout Tiles

Learn how to grout tiles for the perfect finish to the perfect DIY tile project with this quick four step guide from Beaumont Tiles on How to Grout.

Grout – those thin lines you see between each tile on your walls or floor – is a vital part of any well-done tiling job.

While tiles themselves are impervious to water, moisture would still be able to make its way under or behind them unless the gaps between tiles are sealed with the right grout. Grouting your tiles also helps to strengthen the whole installation.

Luckily, grouting is one of the simplest parts of DIY tiling. There’s no secret to learning how to grout: you just need to be prepared to work a little hard. Read on to learn how to grout tiles in four simple steps.

Step One: Mix the Grout

When mixing the grout, add the water first and then the powder to ensure a thorough mix with no lumps. Follow the instructions on your packet and mix to a thick paste-like consistency.

Step Two: Apply the Grout

Apply the grout to the tiles using a grouter.

Push the grout into the joints and compress by wiping over at an angle across the joints. Do not apply grout to the corners where walls meet floors and where two walls meet. You will need to apply silicone here.

Step Three: Clean the Tiles

First, allow the grout to dry and for a film to set on the face of the tiles. Dry times vary dependant on weather conditions.

Then remove the excess grout.

Clean up with a slightly damp sponge. Don’t wash the floor or get it overly wet. The trick here is to lift the film off the tiles without wetting the actual grouted joint.

Keep rinsing your sponge as you go and change your water regularly.

Step Four: Apply Elbow Grease

After most of the grout has been removed from the tiles, give them another once-over with the damp sponge. Only when the grout is completely dry buff over the tiles with clean, dry cloths.

Once the grout is completely dry after 48 hours, we recommend applying a grout sealer.

How to Tile a Kitchen

Tiling a kitchen splashback is a great place for any new do it yourself to start.

How to Tile a Splashback

See below for all our how to tile tips and DIY information for kitchens so you can tile your splashback and get your kitchen renovation off to the best possible start!

The splashback is a key focal point of any good kitchen design. Getting the details right and following through with a high-quality finish on your kitchen splashback tiles can make all the difference to the room that is the heart of your home. Take the time to read our guides and learn how to tile a kitchen splashback yourself for the best results on a budget!

Give yourself the skills and know-how you need to bring your best splashback ideas to life.

 

Tiling a Wall

The secret to tiling a wall perfectly is all in the edges: the bottom row of tiles and the “column” of tiles in the corner need to be perfectly level.

Follow the steps below to learn how to tile a wall.

How to Tile a Wall: Step 1

Wall heights don’t always divide nice and neatly into the exact measurements of your tiles – in fact they often don’t. Because of this, one row of tiles will need to be cut down to fit. You want this row to be the very bottom row of tiles.

To make sure you can do this – and that you know the right size to cut your bottom row, you need to find where the straight, level line for the bottom of your second row of tiles will go.

The easiest way to do this is to measure down from the top of your wall. From the top, measure down the height of one tile and make a mark. Keep repeating until you reach less than one tile’s height from the floor.

At this point, use a spirit level to draw a horizontal line. This will be the bottom of your second row of tiles – and the top of the very bottom row.

Step 2

Measure along the floor where it meets the wall and mark the wall where each tile will begin. Then, line up your tiles for the bottom row and cut them to fit below the line.

Step 3

Prepare your tiles by “back-buttering” them with adhesive and push them onto the wall. The key to success is to make sure that you have full coverage of the adhesive on the back of the tile. You want to avoid any hollow spaces behind the tiles.

Step 4

As you add tiles, use a tile levelling system to ensure there is no lippage on the surface. A good levelling system can also double as a tile spacer.

Don’t screw down your first row of wall tiles until you’re completely happy with where the tiles are. If there are any gaps under the tiles, use wedges to hold them up. It’s important to make sure the first row is completely level.

Step 5

Continue adding tiles to the wall, row by row, checking that they’re level as you go. With pre-mixed adhesive use a 6mm notched trowel (check the instructions on the pack) to apply the adhesive.

When applying adhesive for wall tiles we always recommend that the notches run horizontally across the wall.

Step 6

Once the glue has dried, knock out the clips. It’s essential that you knock them out in the same direction as the grout lines.

With the wall tiles securely laid, the next step is grouting. Click the link below to learn how.

How to Lay Tiles

Ready to jump in and get your hands dirty with a bit of DIY tiling? Before you start sticking down any tiles, make sure you spend a little time reading through these simple instructions and planning how you want to lay your tiles out. Check out our 15 golden rules of tiling before you begin to make sure you're well prepared for a job you'll be able to admire and enjoy for many years to come.

Laying Tiles - Step 1

These steps focus on laying floor tiles. If you're planning to lay wall tiles, we recommend that you also read our guide on how to lay wall tiles.

Measure out a full tile from your wall (or the edge of your surface for laying tiles on) to establish a straight, square line and a starting point for tiling.

Mark the area where you'll start tiling.

Step 2

Once you've got your guideline ready, it's time to do a "dry lay" of your tiles to make sure you have your layout and the amount of tiles you need right. This helps plan and work out any cuts you should make before you start laying tiles.

Dry laying is also important to ensure that you get a chance to see how all your tiles look together and whether there are any issues you should check out before they're permanently stuck down!

The fun part of dry laying, however, is getting to play around with your tile layout - how you arrange your tiles to bring out your style and the best aspects of your space. Check out our guide to the most popular tile laying patterns.

Step 3

Mix your tile adhesive following the manufacturer's instructions. An electric glue mixer may come in handy for larger jobs.

Once mixed, your adhesive should be about the same consistency as toothpaste.

Spread about one square metre of adhesive where you will start laying tiles. Starting along the straight line you've drawn is always a good idea.

For floor tiles use a 12mm notched trowel to spread adhesive. By using a notched trowel, the adhesive is applied leaving little tracks on the floor. Once the tiles are "bedded" into place these notches will flatten out to leave a bed of adhesive 6mm thick.

Step 4

Place each tile in position with a firm push and bed it into place with a slight up and down wiggle across the notches of the adhesive.

Every now and then, lift a tile to check that it has complete coverage of the adhesive.

Step 5

As you lay the tiles, use spacers to set the grout joints and to make small adjustments to the tile placement. This keeps all grout joints level and even.

Using a tile leveling system - good ones also double as grout spacers - will make getting a professional finish much easier. Position at the corner of each tile, and screw down the caps. This will give you a more professional finish.

Step 6

Clean off any excess glue as you go, using a damp sponge.

Step 7

Once the tiles are laid and the glue is dry, knock out the caps. It is important to knock them out in the same direction of the grout line.

Step 8

You may see some excess glue residue between the grout lines. Don't forget to keep tidy as you work and ensure that the space between tiles is free for grout.

The next step will be grouting your tiles. Read our next guide to learn more.

Bathroom Renovations

You’ll spend a lot of time in your dream bathroom. First thing each morning, last at night. Every day of most weeks, you’ll see the choices you made. We want all those choices to become good memories.

Good planning is the key to getting it right. As everyone who’s done it will tell you: a bathroom renovation from start to finish takes time and money. That’s a given. But without good planning, there can be a lot of unexpected costs and disruptions along the way.

You want to create a place that works seven days a week. Where the light is right for the morning hair, makeup routine. The daily shave or the weekend’s serious manscaping.

Which is why we say: talk to our experts. Talking is free. Our tile experts know all about tiles. Tiles that feel good underfoot. How light plays off the surface of some tiles, accentuating key features.

The right tile for the job is technically well understood. But when it comes to the look and feel: that’s personal, that’s up to you. With so many to choose from, it can be challenging not to end up with a mish-mash of styles. Or play it safe and get dullsville. Or blow the budget in one area and scrimp in another. That’s not good planning.

Talk to our design team. They’re great listeners. Talking and listening are free. These people care about aesthetics. How it looks and feels. They share your passion to create a unique space. To suit your likes, your home. To suit you. They can explain why some shapes and colours might feel unsettling in some spaces. Why other choices can add value, as well as comfort—even delight!

You’ll want to relax in the warmth and beauty of the space you’ve made, to think about important things: that story you’re trying to finish. What the kids said that made you laugh … and cry a little, too. All the big and little things we think and dream about in this special space when we have time to just be ourselves. To wash away stress, sometimes tears.

From start to finish: you want to get it right. Contact our people who are here to help you get it right. And create good memories along the way.

If you have more questions

Rugs

What is polypropylene?

Polypropylene is a man made material that was engineered to have a wide variety of benefits - it feels like a mix between silk and wool, is super soft, but is also "stain resistant".  This means is if you get to spills quickly they won't absorb right away and will lift straight off - impressive and practical in households with kids or pets. 

Do wool rugs shed?

Yes, wool rugs do shed, it's a natural feature of the woollen fibre and isn't considered a fault.  Shedding isn't usually a problem after a settling in period, dependant upon use.  Regular vacuuming, 1-2 times a week should help during this time.  This should keep your rug fresh and clean and prevent dirt penetrating the pile.  It's important to make sure that you don't use a power head and just vacuum gently so that you're not breaking the wool fibres. 

How to choose a rug size

The size of your space and your chosen layout are the main considerations when choosing a rug size. If you think your space is between sizes or you're not quite sure, err on the side of caution by opting for a larger size to ensure the area looks well-considered and thoughtful rather than haphazard.

Here are some of the most common rug sizes:

Shop small rugs 120 x 170cm (4' x 6') 
Shop medium rugs 160 x 230cm (5' x 7') 
Shop large rugs 200 x 300cm (7' x 10')

Shop extra large rugs 240 x 330cm (9' x 11')
Shop oversized rugs  over 300 x 400cm

Shop runners 75 x 300-400cm

1. Whole living space
In a smaller room, you can use a rug to cover most of the floor space as an alternative to fitted carpet. It helps to draw the eye across the width of the room, creating the illusion of extra space. Be sure to leave a border of 20-30cm between the rug and the walls.  
 
2. Living large
To make a room feel more expansive, choose a large rug that will fit all your living area furniture on top. This is the ideal way to define a space within a large open-plan area. 
 
3. Cosy living
If your rug (or your budget) doesn't stretch that far, just put the front legs of your sofa and chairs on the rug to anchor the space.
 
4. Floating living
A floating rug can also work as long as it's in proportion to the furniture, as with the coffee table and sofa here. 
How to choose a rug for your bedroom
1. Classic Bedroom

For a cohesive look, place a large rug under the bed, remembering that only pattern or colour at the outer part of the rug will be visible. Use your bed as your sizing guide, bearing in mind that the rug/s should extend about 45 - 60cm beyond all sides.

2. Layered bedroom
For a more eclectic bedroom look, use smaller rugs on either side or at the foot of the bed. Try beautiful natural hides coupled with plush wool for the ultimate comfort.
 
How to choose a rug for your dining space
Expansive dining

If you're placing a rug under a dining table, it should be wide enough so the chairs are completely on the rug even when guests are sitting at the table. This usually means allowing an extra 60cm to both the length and width of your table, or to the diameter if it's round.

 

What rug qualities matter to you?

Ideal

- Low pile heat set polypropylene works well in dining spaces, its stain resistance, moisture resistance and high-impact colour ensuring it looks great even after a few spillages.
- Cotton rugs are often machine washable, so you can forget the elbow grease and let modern technology do the work.
- Wool is naturally stain resistant, and low pile weaves are the easiest to spot-treat.

Avoid

- Jute and sisal can irreversibly stain, and although they can be spot cleaned, it's not as easy to take care of than wool, cotton, or synthetics. ​

Gives Your Home An Organic Look

Ideal

- Jute and sisal are your friend, as long as you're styling it in a quiet nook. Keep foot traffic to a minimum and you'll love the low-key look of this beautiful material.​
- Flat weave wool, especially wool kilims, work perfectly if you're after a bohemian look.

Avoid

- Heat set polypropylene​ has its qualities, but its synthetic nature and perfect finish are the antithesis of the style you're after.
  ​
Feels Luxurious Underfoot

Ideal

- Animal hides are unrivalled in their silky softness. The beautiful material looks as luxurious as it feels.
- Sheepskin is a gorgeous high pile option that feels beautiful. It's perfect on your hearth, or by the side of the bed as the first thing you step on in the morning.
- Silk is a great choice in low traffic areas, but wool is a good balance of softness and durability, and can be used throughout the home in all areas.

Avoid

- Synthetic choices can be very soft, but their synthetic feel provides a less luxurious note to your home.
- Jute and sisal can be a little rough/coarse underfoot.

How to choose a rug style

Choose a rug style to suit your lifestyle as well as your home. Think about how much traffic the rug will need to handle, whether you'll be eating on it, or if you have kids and pets using the space. Is your style eclectic or bohemian? Do you favour bold pattern and colour, or is a neutral palette the foundation to your home? Here are a few of our favourites to consider.

1. Flatweave rugs

Ranging from traditional kilims or dhurries to modern styles featuring patterns, stripes and chevrons, these rugs have no pile because of the way they are woven on a loom. They are often more affordable than pile rugs and are a great way to update a room, but they are also less durable. They won't last as long as a pile rug in high traffic situations and we recommend using a rug pad or underlay to keep them in place.

2. Natural fibre rugs

Flat woven from natural fibres such as jute, sisal, coir or seagrass, these rugs add a casual feel. They're generally durable, but require regular vacuuming to stop dirt from penetrating the fibres. They don't like getting wet, so steam cleaning is out and spills should be dealt with immediately, spot cleaning is best. Many feature a latex backing to protect your floor and keep them in place.

3. Heat-set polypropylene rugs

When buying a synthetic fibre pile rug, look for higher quality heat-set polypropylene. It's soft, durable and non-shedding, making it a good choice for families and high-traffic areas. It's also non-static which means that it's easy to vacuum up lint and pet fur. 

4. Pile rugs

Pile rugs may be hand made (often described as hand-knotted or hand-tufted) or machine made. The pile protects the warp and weft and a high quality hand-knotted rug, cared for well, can last a generation or more. Choice of style and price is almost boundless, from traditional Persian designs made using wool and silk to modern 'shag' styles. Materials include wool and silk through to practical synthetics such as acrylic and polypropylene. 

5. Wool rugs

High-quality wool rugs are soft and richly textured, so ideal for making a statement in the living room or adding luxe texture and warmth in a bedroom or nursery. Wool is naturally water and stain-resistant, thanks to the lanolin that coats the fibres. Wool is also known to hold colour well for vibrant results in a rug, as well as being a good sustainable material choice. 

6. Indoor/outdoor rugs

Made using polypropylene or similar synthetic fibres, these rugs are super practical and are now available in a surprisingly wide array of patterns and finishes. They can be hosed down if necessary, and they work well outdoors as well as in areas where kids and pets run wild!

7. Hide rugs & sheepkins

Hide rugs add a cool, contemporary edge and are beautifully tactile. Cow hide rugs may be natural in colour, dyed or even printed. Style a large hide under a coffee table or next to the bed, or use them to layer over larger rugs or even furniture. Hides sold at TFG are by-products of the food production industry, and all products meet or exceed strict Australian government import standards.

Shape up

When it comes to choosing the perfect rug for your space, it's not just size that matters. Here are our tips for defining your space with round rugs, runners and hides.

Rectangular rugs

The most popular and versatile, as it's the shape of most rooms! The key is to choose one in the right proportions (see Layouts).

Round rugs

Great in a bedroom, under a round dining table, or to define a small sitting area. Round jute rugs in a range of colours and weaves are a great affordable choice.

Runners

Make a smart first impression with a hall runner to set the scene for your interior style, or add visual interest to an otherwise bland hallway.

The quick rug care guide

Care instructions vary for each type of rug, but here are some general tips for flat weave, pile and natural fibre rugs.

- Your rug may arrive folded or rolled, and will take a few days to flatten out. Some rugs may also shed for a few weeks – this is normal and should ease after vacuuming. 

- Vacuum regularly to pick up particles of dust and dirt. 

- Treat spills or stains as soon as possible. Don't rub! Blot the stain with a dry cloth or towel first to soak up excess moisture. Use a toothbrush with a small amount of mild liquid soap or wool wash and water to loosen stains, then blot again. 

- If your rug is in a sunny spot or receives a lot of foot traffic, rotate it regularly to ensure even wear. 

Rug underlays are a great way to keep a rug in place as well as prevent the rug from slipping. They will protect your floor from coarse natural fibres and make your rug feel even softer underfoot. They also protect the base of the rug against inevitable friction against the floor, working as a shock absorber.

If you have more questions